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Lotto Documentary

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Hi All,

I'm begining research for what I imagine to be a short documentary on lottery.  If all goes according to plan I also "hope" to tie lottery to a larger examination of the american dream. 

To begin, I would like to start small.  I would like to conduct interviews at my local convience store with all the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets.  However, I'm concerned with the way in which I should approach the subject with them.  I certaintly don't want to come off as cynical and/or offensive.  Are there any questions that I should avoid?  I'd rather not make the interview about lottery but more focused towards their own personal reasons for playing lottery.. their own prospects of fortune.. what they would do with the money won...  have they lost hope in their own achievements and skills that they feel their only way to get ahead is to play lottery?  Of course I don't want to ask these kind of questions without first knowing what is or isn't appropriate. 

 

Thanks for your time and consideration..

 

Best Regards,

Josh 

Todd's avatar - Cylon 200.jpg

No offense, but I don't think you'd make a very good investigative reporter.  You have already made up your mind as to who plays the lottery and why.

To stereotype lottery players is a tired, worn out message that we are all bored with.

Of course, I am speaking about your reference to "the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets", as well as your other slanted points. 

Please stay far away from the subject of lottery games and players, as your documentary would be filled with stereotypes and mis-informed ideas. 

Again, no offense, but you sound like a social-engineering type who thinks you know what is best for people.  You don't.

Avatar

Hi All,

I'm begining research for what I imagine to be a short documentary on lottery.  If all goes according to plan I also "hope" to tie lottery to a larger examination of the american dream. 

To begin, I would like to start small.  I would like to conduct interviews at my local convience store with all the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets.  However, I'm concerned with the way in which I should approach the subject with them.  I certaintly don't want to come off as cynical and/or offensive.  Are there any questions that I should avoid?  I'd rather not make the interview about lottery but more focused towards their own personal reasons for playing lottery.. their own prospects of fortune.. what they would do with the money won...  have they lost hope in their own achievements and skills that they feel their only way to get ahead is to play lottery?  Of course I don't want to ask these kind of questions without first knowing what is or isn't appropriate. 

 

Thanks for your time and consideration..

 

Best Regards,

Josh 

you don't know too much about the average lottery player.looks like you are lost in regards to this topic.i'm middle class,young and i habitually buy lottery tickets,lol.

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No offense, but I don't think you'd make a very good investigative reporter.  You have already made up your mind as to who plays the lottery and why.

To stereotype lottery players is a tired, worn out message that we are all bored with.

Of course, I am speaking about your reference to "the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets", as well as your other slanted points. 

Please stay far away from the subject of lottery games and players, as your documentary would be filled with stereotypes and mis-informed ideas. 

Again, no offense, but you sound like a social-engineering type who thinks you know what is best for people.  You don't.

I Agree!

Why don't you talk to people that buy lottery tickets, period -- and try to pretend that you don't have a clue what their social status is or how much money they have ? 

 

Thoth's avatar - binary

"To begin, I would like to start small.  I would like to conduct interviews at my local convience store with all the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets."

There was a skit on the Carlos Mencia Show the other day: "What do you feed your kids lady??? Losing Lotery Tickets...lol.  Then there was also an article I once read that called the lottery a "tax on stupid people."  Lotto players seem to get stereotyped for some reason.

Most everyone I know who buys lotto tickets is middle class, but then again, I have seen people buy ten dollars or more worth of scratch off tickets that would have been better off spending their money on a bar of soap and a toothbrush!!

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exactly what i was afraid of..  so let me rephrase:

I live in a poor neighborhood of NYC and the people who play lottery at my corner store are poor.  They play lottery and pay for food with food stamps. 
 I realize that lottery for most people is a game and I am perfectly fine with this. 

I appreciate your comments and I know that questioning people on how they spend their money is a sensitive subject.  The fact that I first posted on this message board should inform you of how aware I am regarding this subject. 

I came to this message board for useful advice and your own personal comments/history on the topic of lottery.  Don't you question your own motives for playing lottery?  Please understand that I would like to explore this subject with the utmost respect for those who play the game and those who don't.

 

Sincerely Sincere,

Josh 

Tenaj's avatar - michellea

Hi All,

I'm begining research for what I imagine to be a short documentary on lottery.  If all goes according to plan I also "hope" to tie lottery to a larger examination of the american dream. 

To begin, I would like to start small.  I would like to conduct interviews at my local convience store with all the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets.  However, I'm concerned with the way in which I should approach the subject with them.  I certaintly don't want to come off as cynical and/or offensive.  Are there any questions that I should avoid?  I'd rather not make the interview about lottery but more focused towards their own personal reasons for playing lottery.. their own prospects of fortune.. what they would do with the money won...  have they lost hope in their own achievements and skills that they feel their only way to get ahead is to play lottery?  Of course I don't want to ask these kind of questions without first knowing what is or isn't appropriate. 

 

Thanks for your time and consideration..

 

Best Regards,

Josh 

What?Are you doing college internship, amateur film maker for a film festival/contest entry? 

Avatar

I am a professional film editor in NYC.  This documentary is a personal project of mine, inspired by my own "hopes and dreams."  In all truth I plan to only use lottery as a springboard for an examination on "the american dream."

LAVERNE MALONEY's avatar - smallgirl

Hello there Hemmermferm: 

Perhaps you should look at this thread (link below), another poster posted a topic dealing with a lottery documentary.

https://www.lotterypost.com/thread/129725

LAVERNE MALONEY's avatar - smallgirl

exactly what i was afraid of..  so let me rephrase:

I live in a poor neighborhood of NYC and the people who play lottery at my corner store are poor.  They play lottery and pay for food with food stamps. 
 I realize that lottery for most people is a game and I am perfectly fine with this. 

I appreciate your comments and I know that questioning people on how they spend their money is a sensitive subject.  The fact that I first posted on this message board should inform you of how aware I am regarding this subject. 

I came to this message board for useful advice and your own personal comments/history on the topic of lottery.  Don't you question your own motives for playing lottery?  Please understand that I would like to explore this subject with the utmost respect for those who play the game and those who don't.

 

Sincerely Sincere,

Josh 


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Quote hermmermfermReport Inappropriate ContentTop of pagePosted: Today, 9:27 pm - IP Logged

I am a professional film editor in NYC.  This documentary is a personal project of mine, inspired by my own "hopes and dreams."  In all truth I plan to only use lottery as a springboard for an examination on "the american dream."

Hermmermferm: you said you "live in a poor neighborhood in NYC" & then you say that you are "a professional film editor".

I looked at some of those salaries, they start at least $20k, then after 5 years $53k & then after 10-15 years in the business $70K.

I don't understand that.

dvdiva's avatar - 8ball

Hi All,

I'm begining research for what I imagine to be a short documentary on lottery.  If all goes according to plan I also "hope" to tie lottery to a larger examination of the american dream. 

To begin, I would like to start small.  I would like to conduct interviews at my local convience store with all the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets.  However, I'm concerned with the way in which I should approach the subject with them.  I certaintly don't want to come off as cynical and/or offensive.  Are there any questions that I should avoid?  I'd rather not make the interview about lottery but more focused towards their own personal reasons for playing lottery.. their own prospects of fortune.. what they would do with the money won...  have they lost hope in their own achievements and skills that they feel their only way to get ahead is to play lottery?  Of course I don't want to ask these kind of questions without first knowing what is or isn't appropriate. 

 

Thanks for your time and consideration..

 

Best Regards,

Josh 

Being cynical and offensive guarantees you a job with the national press core. I would avoid asking any questions. Just make it up. You could ask old people, preferably living in the south and in a trailer about the lottery but make sure to misquote them. To get plenty of misquotes just tell them in advance that the equipment doesn't work to well and make sure there are plenty of takes.

As far as what's approprate - why care. "Are those real?"(in reference to a woman's chest), "Are those your real teeth?", "Are you stupid or just unintellegent?" It's all fair game. Of course if you are doing your interviews in the south, in trailer parks make sure your first question is "Are you an inbred racist hick?". That should really put you off on a good start.

tntea's avatar - Lottery-059.jpg

"To begin, I would like to start small.  I would like to conduct interviews at my local convience store with all the older, poorer people that habitually buy lottery tickets."

There was a skit on the Carlos Mencia Show the other day: "What do you feed your kids lady??? Losing Lotery Tickets...lol.  Then there was also an article I once read that called the lottery a "tax on stupid people."  Lotto players seem to get stereotyped for some reason.

Most everyone I know who buys lotto tickets is middle class, but then again, I have seen people buy ten dollars or more worth of scratch off tickets that would have been better off spending their money on a bar of soap and a toothbrush!!

ThudWell said.. I have seen lots of those..

 

Todd's avatar - Cylon 200.jpg

exactly what i was afraid of..  so let me rephrase:

I live in a poor neighborhood of NYC and the people who play lottery at my corner store are poor.  They play lottery and pay for food with food stamps. 
 I realize that lottery for most people is a game and I am perfectly fine with this. 

I appreciate your comments and I know that questioning people on how they spend their money is a sensitive subject.  The fact that I first posted on this message board should inform you of how aware I am regarding this subject. 

I came to this message board for useful advice and your own personal comments/history on the topic of lottery.  Don't you question your own motives for playing lottery?  Please understand that I would like to explore this subject with the utmost respect for those who play the game and those who don't.

 

Sincerely Sincere,

Josh 

It's pretty much useless to rephrase, because any documentary of this type about the lottery is always wrong-headed and filled with stereotypes.  Every single one.

People like to gamble, and the lottery is the only legitimate form of gambling readily available to them.  How hard to understand is that?

Any kind of reading into the situation beyond that is nonsense, and that is where people start stereotyping.  They need to look for "angles" to fill their time slot, and out pop the stereotypes.

Of course you see poor people playing if you live in a poor neighborhood.  DUH!

If you lived in a rich neighborhood who do you think you would see playing?

The subject is only sensitive because players do not like people like you trying to inject stereotypes into their love of the games.  It's not sensitive because -- e-gads -- someone happened to mention poor people.

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BobP's avatar - bobp avatar.png

hermmermferm: Begin your search for information here http://www.naspl.org/faq.html

Work these facts into your documentory and you'll have the basis for a balanced report.

Then keep in mind, the lottery is perhaps the only one dollar investment with a possible return of millions of dollars. 

Buying a lottery ticket keeps hope alive long after the reality of one's situation has otherwise crushed the human spirit. 

Also remember poor people have the same right to spend their money as they see fit as anyone else. 

BobP

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