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Winning, thats a good thing, Right?

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After winning $315 million in 2002, Jack Whittaker had several run-ins with the law, had $545,000 stolen at a strip bar, and lost his granddaughter to a drug overdose.

 

Juan Rodriguez had 78 cents in his savings account when he won $149 million in the New York state lottery in 2004. Days later, his wife Iris filed for divorce.

 

In 1998, Phyllis Klingebiel sued her own son, Michael, claiming he failed to share the $2 million dollar jackpot he won.

 

About one-third of lottery winners eventually declare bankruptcy, according to the Certified Financial Planners Board of Standards.

 

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Winning the lottery does not solve ALL your problems. In the case of the first two winners listed, they probably were facing problems even before they won. Whittaker probably was a jerk even before winning Powerball, and Rodriguez and his wife's marriage was probably already on the rocks before winning Mega Millions as well. Winning the lottery sometimes only accelerates some problems.

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Of course one never hears about lottery winners who are happy.

I suspect most happy lottery winners are precisely the same people who stay out of the limelight. 

 

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If I won I'd be smart enough to stay out of the limelight. Hopefully I'd win a small Powerball jackpot. :-)

TheGameGrl's avatar - Lottery-012.jpg

...and the real issue was NOT that money changed them so much as the people and circumstances around them changed. Lets face it, you can be the most reasonable person in the world, but your neighbors and society , all will think YOU OWE THEM! If the marriage was bad before the winfall, the money is not going to change that. Stay on solid ground, keep your friends close and your enemy's closer, ya never know when ya need that enemy to take a bullet for ya ! *grin* (just kidding!)

fast eddie's avatar - lasvegas2

These people had problems way before any money came into their lives. The money may have magnified things and given them more options which may have accelrated the process but these people were nerdowells before the cash hit and will probably remain so. 

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Juan Rodriguez had 78 cents in his savings account when he won $149 million in the New York state lottery in 2004. Days later, his wife Iris filed for divorce.

The loving wife had already filed for divorce and left the country.  Heard he won, came back, dropped the suit, sued for half the money, won the suit, filed for divorce, and left the country again.  She proved she was a slut, now she is a rich slut.  He is living in a New York City hotel in a luxuary suite.  Hasn't left it in over a year.  His borother is living with him.  All they do is smoke and watch cable movies.  He proved he was a loser, now his is a rich loser.

After winning $315 million in 2002, Jack Whittaker had several run-ins with the law, had $545,000 stolen at a strip bar, and lost his granddaughter to a drug overdose.

Anything recent?  Last I heard, the shock of losing his granddaughter caused him to wake up.  He cancelled his charity office.  Dropped his website.  Finished AAA.  No longer gambles.  You may need a new poster child.

In 1998, Phyllis Klingebiel sued her own son, Michael, claiming he failed to share the $2 million dollar jackpot he won.

Do you think, maybe Phyllis was a lousy mother and failed to teach her son anything but selfisness?  How many guys wake up one day and immediately hate their mother?  None, takes years to build up.  NOthing to do with winning the lottery. 

About one-third of lottery winners eventually declare bankruptcy, according to the Certified Financial Planners Board of Standards.


I'd like to see the link on that.  It would interesting to now exactly how many lottery winners they actually tracked, and what the basis for the summatioin was.  I would like to know how many failed since the jackpots went into the multimillions, verses those who won smalled amounts years ago.  What was the education level of those who failed?  What was the education level of those who succeeded?  How many failed that had professional advisors from a well known organization?  How many failed by grouping?  $1M to $5M bracket.  $5M to 10M bracket.  Throwing out numbers mean zilch!  they need to be put in perspective.

 

 

sirbrad's avatar - Lottery-062.jpg

As I said in another thread, the news loves to report the few bad cases out there but almost never report the many good stories that have become of the lives of probably hundreds if not more jackpot winners. They would be too boring for most, as opposed to the Jack ones.

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